Author: aks14010

December Creative Writing Awards

Wallace Stevens Poetry Prize

Deadline: December 10, 2018

Prizes: $1,000 (first); $500 (second); $250 (third)

Each year since 1964, a prominent poet has been invited to give a reading at the University of Connecticut as part of the Wallace Stevens Poetry Program. A student poetry contest is held in conjunction with that program. First, second, and third place cash prizes are awarded. Prize winners read from their work at the annual program, and winning poems will be published in the Long River Review.

Who’s Eligible

Undergraduate and graduate students from the University of Connecticut’s main and regional campuses, except previous first place winners.

Guidelines

Submit a single MS Word document containing the cover sheet followed by 5-8 pages of poems (cleanly typed, only one poem per page). This can be up to eight short poems, or several longer pieces. Please submit your work via e-mail following these guidelines. The subject line of the email must indicate the full name of the contest. Note that while your student ID number should appear on every page, your name should appear only on the cover sheet.

Aetna Translation Award

Deadline: December 10, 2018

Prize: $250

Students may submit one poem or an excerpt from a longer prose piece (maximum 1,500 words) translated into English, along with the original language version. The submission should consist of one Word document attachment: your cover sheet and your translated piece including the original language version.

Collins Literary Prizes

Deadline: December 10, 2018

Prizes: Varies Annually. The 2017–2018 awards were $2,000 each.

Awarded in memory of Edward R. and Frances S. Collins for the best undergraduate literary works. Two cash prizes are awarded, one in prose and one in poetry. Prize-winning works will be published in the Long River Review.

Who’s Eligible 

Undergraduate students at the University of Connecticut’s main and regional campuses.

Guidelines 

Please submit your work via e-mail following these guidelines. The subject line must include the full name of the contest and the genre of your submission (for example: “Collins Literary Prizes: poetry or prose”). The submission should consist of a single MS Word document that contains your cover sheet (see format) followed by your submission. (Note that while your student ID number should appear on every page of the packet, your name should appear only on the cover sheet.) Students may submit work in more than one genre but please do so in separate e-mails (in other words, do not include a short story and a poem in the same e-mail).

For this prize, please submit each piece individually.

Jennie Hackman Memorial Award for Short Fiction

Deadline: December 10, 2018

Prizes: $1,000 (first); $300 (second); $200 (third)

Awarded in memory of Jacob and Jennie Hackman for the best works of undergraduate short fiction. Up to three cash prizes awarded. Winning stories will be published in the Long River Review.

Who’s Eligible 

Undergraduate students at the University of Connecticut’s main and regional campuses.

Guidelines 

Please submit your work via e-mail following these guidelines. The subject line must include the name of the contest. The submission should consist of a single MS Word document that contains your cover sheet (see format) followed by your submission. Note that while your student ID number should appear on every page of the packet, your name should appear only on the cover sheet.

Aetna Creative Nonfiction Awards

Deadline: December 10, 2018

Prizes: Graduate $200-500; Undergraduate: $200-500

One prize each for the best graduate and undergraduate works of creative nonfiction will be awarded. Winners will receive a cash prize and will read from their work at an evening program featuring a notable guest author. Undergraduate first place winner’s work will also be published in the Long River Review.

Who’s Eligible

Graduate and undergraduate students at the University of Connecticut’s main and regional campuses.

Guidelines

Students may submit one unpublished creative nonfiction work. Please submit your work via e-mail following these guidelines. The subject line must include the name of the contest and your student status (for example: “AETNA Creative Nonfiction Awards – undergraduate”). The submission should be a single MS Word document that contains your cover sheet (see format) followed by your submission. Note that while your student ID number should appear on every page of the packet, your name should appear only on the cover sheet.

Long River Graduate Writing Award

Deadline: December 10, 2018

Prizes: $250

One cash prize awarded for the best piece of creative work in any genre written by a graduate student. The winning piece will be published in the Long River Review.

Who’s Eligible

Graduate students from any University of Connecticut department or campus.

Guidelines

Graduate students may submit prose pieces of up to 2,500 words, or for poetry, 1-3 poems. Please submit your work via e-mail following these guidelines. The subject line must include the full name of the contest and the genre of your submission (for example: “Long River Graduate Writing Award – poetry”). The submission should consist of a single MS Word document that contains your cover sheet (see format) followed by the submission. Note that while your student ID number should appear on every page of the packet, your name should appear only on the cover sheet.

Aetna Children’s Literature Award

Deadline: December 10, 2018

Prize: Graduate or Undergraduate, $250
The winning piece will be published in Long River Review.

Who’s Eligible:

Graduate and Undergraduate students from any University of Connecticut department or campus.

Guidelines

Please indicate whether you are submitting a manuscript for a picture book, a sample of children’s poetry or drama, or an excerpt from a middle-grade chapter book or a young adult novel. Limit of 3,000 words. Submit your work via e-mail following these guidelines. The subject line must include the full name of the contest and the genre of your submission (for example: “Collins Literary Prizes: poetry or prose”). The submission should consist of a single MS Word document that contains your cover sheet (see format) followed by the piece that you are submitting. Note that while your student ID number should appear on every page of the packet, your name should appear only on the cover sheet.

Wallace Stevens in Hartford: Glen MacLeod

Wednesday, November 14  —  Glen MacLeod, UConn Professor of English at Waterbury, will speak on “Wallace Stevens and Surrealism.”  The lecture will draw on the major Surrealist exhibition at the Wadsworth Atheneum, “Monsters and Myths:  Surrealism and War in the 1930s and 1940s” (October 20, 2018 – January 19, 2019).

Stevens’s first book, Harmonium (1923), records the spirit of New York Dada, a precursor of Surrealism.  During the 1930s he developed a new kind of poetry, partly in response to the full range of Surrealist art that he saw at the Wadsworth Atheneum, then the most modern museum in the United States. His breakthrough poem, “The Man with the Blue Guitar” (1937), was inspired by Picasso’s Surrealist period.

3:00 p.m. in the Hartford Times Building, Room 145.

Leigh Grossman Fiction Reading

Wednesday, November 14

Leigh Grossman/Fiction Reading

UConn Bookstore, Storrs Center, 6:00 pm

 

Sponsored by the Creative Writing Program and the UConn Bookstore.

 

Leigh Grossman is a writer, college lecturer, editor, and publishing consultant. He teaches in the English Department at the University of Connecticut and does typesetting, book development, and book production for various publishers and authors via his company, Swordsmith Productions. Grossman is the author of sixteen published books, most recently fantasy novel The Lost Daughters. He compiled and edited Sense of Wonder, the largest single-volume science fiction anthology ever produced. Previously, he was a production supervisor at Avon Books, an editor at Byron Preiss Visual Publications/Multimedia, a college-level history and writing instructor, and a reviewer for several genre magazines. He lives in northeast Connecticut with his wife and young daughter, where he serves as an elected member of two town boards.

Grossman’s writing credits include fantasy novels The Green Lion and The Golden Thorns; nonfiction works The Red Sox Fan Handbook, The Adult Student’s Guide, and The New England Museum Guide; along with several other books, and he was the original review editor for Horror magazine (where he primarily reviewed dark fantasy). He went on to write reviews for Wavelengths and Absolute Magnitude.

 

Brown Bag Talk: Sarah Winter

Winter Flyer

“Human Rights and the Novelization of Habeas Corpus in Godwin’s Caleb Williams.”

This event will take place in Austin 217 at 2:30 pm on November 14.

Sarah Winter is the author of The Pleasures of Memory: Learning to Read with Charles Dickens (Fordham UP, 2011) andFreud and the Institution of Psychoanalytic Knowledge (Stanford UP, 1999). In Spring semester 2012, she held the UConn Human Rights Institute Faculty Fellowship to work on a book project titled “A Test of Sovereignty: The Novel, Habeas Corpus, and Human Rights.” This project examines personifications of the political prisoner and the fugitive slave in Anglo-American habeas corpus jurisprudence, abolitionist writings, and the novel, in order to trace the formulation of modern legal conceptions of human rights in the long nineteenth century. Her articles have appeared in journals such as Victorian Studies, Novel: A Forum on Fiction, Cultural Critique, and Comparative Literature Studies, and she won the North American Victorian Studies Association’s Donald Gray Prize for the best article in Victorian studies from 2009 for “Darwin’s Saussure: Biosemiotics and Race in Expression,” published in Representations. Her recent teaching includes courses in Victorian literature, classical rhetoric, the modern novel, and literature and human rights. Recent lectures include invited talks at the University of Zürich and the University of Cologne, and panel presentations at conferences organized by the Society for Novel Studies, the North American Victorian Studies Association, the American Comparative Literature Association, and the Dickens Project at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She is also Co-Director of the Graduate Program in Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies and organizer of the faculty study group on Refugees, Narratives, and Media for the Research Program on Humanitarianism at the UConn Human Rights Institute.

Mary Madec Poetry Reading

MARY MADEC poetry reading, Nov. 13, AUST 202 at 11:00am

Irish poet Mary Madec is a graduate of NUI Galway and the University of Pennsylvania, where she was awarded her doctorate in Linguistics. In 2008 she was the recipient of Ireland’s prestigious Hennessy XO Award for Emerging Poetry. She has published two volumes with Salmon Poetry Press, In Other Words (2010) and Demeter Does Not Remember (2014). She is current Director of the Villanova University Study Abroad Program in Galway.

FREE & OPEN to all but pls reserve a seat if indicated–mary.burke@uconn.edu for ACCOMMODATIONS

Writing Life Panel

On Thursday, November 8, the Creative Writing program will host a panel on the MFA, publishing, and other avenues of professionalizing as a creative writer. There will be free pizza, with free and honest advice! Speakers include: Darcie Dennigan, Sean Forbes, Brian Sneeden, and Julia Brush. Austin 217 (Stern Room).

Career Panel

Upcoming Career Panel for English majors November 7, 4-5:45

This panel will reinforce the value of the major and numerous career directions open to English majors.

Job options specific to the skills of English majors are now quite varied, as English majors are increasingly in demand for their writing and communication skills.  The panelists below are testimony to the creative ways in which English majors are shaping careers for themselves.

Place:  Stern Room, Austin 217.  Refreshments will be served.

Four UConn English major alumnae (see below) will present information about their own career and job search strategies.  Given their experiences and professions, they have valuable advice and will answer questions about the job market, job searches and interviews, and the specific value of the major. Panelists:

Emily Chiarelli (‘15), Assistant Production Editor, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Guilford

Laura Costello (’15), Assistant Production Editor, Penny Publications, LLC, Norwalk

Karelyn Kuzcenski (‘16), Senior Research Analyst, Ipsos, Norwalk

Eric Vo (‘13), Marketing Specialist, The Hartford, Hartford

If you have questions, please e-mail ruth.fairbanks@uconn.edu.

Jon Andersen Poetry Reading

Tuesday, November 6

Jon Andersen/Poetry Reading

UConn Bookstore, Storrs Center, 6:00 pm

 

**This event is a benefit for the Covenant Soup Kitchen in Willimantic. Audience members are invited to make a donation after the reading.**

 

Sponsored by the Creative Writing Program and the UConn Bookstore.

 

Jon Andersen’s books include The Burden Note (2014), an English/Serbo-Croatian chapbook; and Stomp and Sing (2005). He is the editor of the anthology Seeds of Fire: Contemporary Poetry from the Other U.S.A. (2008).   His poems have appeared in print and online publications, including The Café Review, Chiron Review, Connecticut Review, Counterpunch, Exposition Review, Freshwater, HeART, Here, North American Review, The Progressive, Rattle, and The Worcester Review, among others.   He has given readings and delivered workshops to a wide variety of audiences at events throughout the eastern United States, the United Kingdom, and Serbia, including the Ledbury Poetry Festival (2008), the 49th International Festival of Literature in Belgrade (2012), and the 42nd Smederevo Poetry Autumn (2014).   For twelve years he was a high school English and special education teacher, and since 2008 he has been a professor of English at Quinebaug Valley Community College in Danielson and Willimantic, Connecticut. He and his wife, fellow writer and educator Denise Abercrombie, live in Storrs, Connecticut with their two sons, Kit and Miles.

 

“Lovable Racists, Magical Negroes, and White Messiahs”

Book Talk and Signing with Dr. David Ikard on November 6, 2018 at 4 pm in the UConn Bookstore Community Room.

Dr. David Ikard is professor of African American and Diaspora Studies at Vanderbilt University. He has authored four books, including Breaking the Silence: Toward a Black Male Feminist CriticismNation of Cowards: Black Activism in Barack Obama’s Post-Racial America, Blinded by the Whites: Why Race Still Matters in the 21st Century and Lovable Racists, Magical Negroes, and White Messiahs (2017)

For more information, please contact the Africana Studies Institute, africana@uconn.edu.

 

The “Kindness” of Humans

THURS, Nov. 1 at 12:30 pm.

The Early Modern Studies Working Group & UConn English Department Present: The “Kindness” of Humans: Empathy, Race, and Kind in The Tempest and The Shape of Water.

This talk will be given by Jane Hwang Degenhardt, an Associate Professor of English at UMass Amherst. It will take place in the UConn Humanities Institute, which is on the 4th floor of the Homer Babbidge Library.

“What criterias come to distinguish who is human from who is not? In seeking to define a relationship between humanity and humaneness, both Shakespeare’s The Tempest and Guillermo del Toro’s film The Shape of Water project a limit case that demonstrates how the category of the human is fundamentally bounded, exclusionary, and relationally-determined. Examining the ambiguously-hybrid beings the play and film  provide, this talk demonstrates the need for a human rights approach that moves beyond the distinction of the human and which does not reaffirm or deny the ways that metaphysical orders of being are determined through a logic of race.”

 

Lunch will be served prior; RSVP at earlymod@uconn.edu.