Graduate Spotlight

Käpylä Translation Prize

The UConn Program in Literary Translation is delighted to announce that the winner of the inaugural Käpylä Translation Prize ($1,000) is J. Kates, for his outstanding translation of Paper-Thin Skin by Aigerim Tazhi, a Kazakhstani woman poet who writes in Russian. The judge, Burton Pike, selected the winner and shortlisted entries from a competitive pool of submissions spanning a striking diversity of genres and languages.

J. Katesis a well-known American poet, literary translator, and the president and co-director of Zephyr Press.

Among the Shortlisted Translators chosen by Burton Pike were three UConn graduate students:

Jeanne Bonner

Pauline Levy-Valensi

Brian Sneeden

 

Other Shortlisted Translators Include: 

Natascha Bruce

Jennifer Croft

Oleksandra Gordynchuk

Catherine Hammond

Jeremy Tiang

 

The Käpylä Translation Prize is an international prize awarded annually for an exceptional book-length translation project in poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiction from any language into English. The Prize is hosted by UConn’s Program in Literary Translation, and sponsored by Käpylä Publishing.

PEN/Heim Translation Award

We are delighted to announce that PhD candidate Brian Sneeden has just been awarded a prestigious PEN/Heim Translation grant for what will be his third book, a translation of Greek poet Phoebe Giannisi’s Rhapsodia. (Brian’s translation of Giannisi’s  earlier book, Homerica, was published earlier this year.) A link to the Pen award announcement is below.

Congratulations, Brian!

https://pen.org/2018penheimgrants/

Congratulations to Sara Austin and Amanda Greenwell

Sara Austin has been awarded the Children’s Literature Association’s Hannah Beiter Graduate Student Research Grant for archival research at University of California, Riverside. She will explore the Eaton Collection for her dissertation project, “The Evolution of Monsters in Contemporary American Children’s and Young Adult Culture.”

Amanda Greenwell is the winner of Children’s Literature Association’s Graduate Student Essay Award for Jessie Willcox Smith’s Critique of Teleological Girlhood in ‘The Seven Ages of Childhood.”

Congratulations to Brian Sneeden!

Ph.D. student Brian Sneeden’s first book, a collection of poems titled Last City, has been selected for the Carnegie-Mellon Poetry Series, and will be published by Carnegie-Mellon University Press in the fall of 2017. Founded in 1972, the Carnegie-Mellon Poetry Series has published collections by several of the most distinguished figures in contemporary poetry, including Pulitzer Prize winners Franz Wright, Ted Kooser, Rita Dove, and Stephen Dunn.

 

Brian Sneeden

PhD student Brian Sneeden  read from his translations of the work of Phoebe Giannisi, an internationally acclaimed Greek poet, at the Onassis Cultural Center in New York City on October 15th as part of the four-day Antigone Now Festival of Art and Ideas, which incorporates a wide diversity of artistic and literary disciplines. The performance, directed by Isabella Martzopoulou, explores issues of gender, land, and dispossession through movement, music, and poetry.

Congratulations Miller!

Ph.D. candidate Miller Oberman’s first book, a collection of poems and translations called The Unstill Ones, has been chosen by Susan Stewart for the Princeton Series of Contemporary Poets, and will be published by Princeton University Press in 2017. Starting in 1975, the Princeton Series of Contemporary Poets quickly distinguished itself as one of the most important publishing projects of its kind, bringing out landmark books by figures such as Robert Pinsky, Ann Lauterbach, and Jorie Graham.

 

Chad Jewett Wins Dissertation Prize

Chad Jewett (PhD 2015) has been awarded the 2016 Bradford Dissertation Prize of the St. George Tucker Society for his dissertation “Aesthetic Activism: Race, Ethnicity, Literary Experimentalism, and the U.S. South.” His dissertation committee consisted of Veronica Makowsky (Major Advisor), Clare Eby, and Cathy Schlund-Vials. The Fellows of the Tucker Society will read  a chapter of Chad’s dissertation in advance and discuss it with him in a session devoted to the dissertation at their annual conference at the end of July. The Melvin E. Bradford Dissertation Prize is an annual competition that recognizes the best dissertation written on any aspect of the American South.The award was established in 1993 in honor of the late Mel Bradford, Professor of Literature at the University of Dallas. The recipient of the Bradford Prize is awarded $1,000 and expenses to attend the annual meeting. The St. George Tucker Society is an interdisciplinary scholarly organization dedicated to the study of the American South. Founded in 1990, it holds an annual meeting for members and guests during the summer “lay-by” season. These meetings feature presentations by established and beginning scholars. Papers are circulated in advance of the meeting and sessions focus on the engagement between the presenter and the audience.