Faculty Bookshelf: Bhakti Shringarpure

Books by Bhakti Shringarpure

Cold War Assemblages: Decolonization to Digital (Routledge Series in the Cultures of the Global Cold War, 2019).

This book bridges the gap between the simultaneously unfolding histories of postcoloniality and the forty-five-year ideological and geopolitical rivalry between the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. Not only did the superpowers rely upon the decolonizing world to further imperial agendas, but the postcolony itself was shaped, epistemologically and materially, by Cold War discourses, policies, narratives, and paradigms. Ruptures and appropriated trajectories in the postcolonial world can be attributed to the ways in which the Cold War became the afterlife of European colonialism. Through a speculative assemblage, this book connects the dots, deftly taking the reader from Frantz Fanon to Aaron Swartz, and from assassinations in the Third World to American multiculturalism. Whether the Cold War subverted the dream of decolonization or created a compromised cultural sphere, this book makes those rich palimpsests visible.

Mediterranean: Migrant Crossings. Co-editor. (Warscapes magazine and UpSet Press, 2018).

The Mediterranean Sea has become a harrowing gauntlet for hundreds of thousands of refugees and migrants each year. Through the intimacy and immediacy of fiction, poetry, photography and reportage, Mediterranean explores these turbulent journeys. Lyric fiction by Edwidge Danticat, Maaza Mengiste, Boubacar Boris Diop, and Chika Unigwe hones in on the dislocation that marks individual passages. Mario Badagliacca’s haunting photos of found objects recovered from capsized vessels serve as a visual guide to communal tragedy. Poems by Jehan Bseiso and Ali Jimale Ahmed strain with memory and loss, while Hassan Ghedi Santur’s narrative reporting on African migration brings us inside Europe’s detention centers and camps through the eyes of those he meets there, holding the continent to blistering account for the systems it has built and the people it has failed. Evoking the sustenance of home, the book also includes recipes from migrants along with stories connecting them to the places they left behind. Mediterranean is the first book by the editors of Warscapes magazine.

shringarpure-imagine-africa
Imagine Africa: Volume 3. Editor. (Archipelago Books, 2017).
Through a collage of poems, essays, fiction, conversations, and visual art, Imagine Africa: Volume Three brings together some of the most essential writers, artists, and thinkers of contemporary Africa. Including powerful photographs in color by Zanele Muholi, stills from the films of Jean-Pierre Bekolo, and works of fiction and poetry from nine languages, Imagine Africa: Volume Three offers a glimpse into a kaleidoscopic and vibrant continent. The series is published by Island Position, the literary imprint of the Pirogue Collective—the cultural expression of Senegal’s Gorée Institute, which aims to celebrate the diverse voices and imaginations of the continent of Africa and its diaspora. The collective encourages vital dialogue between writers and visual artists from across Africa with those from other parts of the world. Spanning across numerous languages, traditions, and media, Imagine Africa: Volume Three brings together some of the most essential voices and visions of Africa today.
Literary Sudans: An Anthology of Literature from Sudan and South Sudan. Editor. (Africa World Press, 2016).
This collection brings together twenty authors from two warring nations with an aim to highlight their shared literary and cultural heritage. This collection introduces readers to a host of new and emerging voices from the Sudans while acknowledging the debt to prolific and well known writers from the region, such as Leila Aboulela, Francis Deng and Tarek El Tayeb. Introduction by Taban Lo Liyong and translations by Adil Babikir.

Kaveena, a novel by Boubacar Boris Diop. (Indiana University Press, 2016). Translator, with Sara Hanaburgh.

This dark and suspenseful novel tells the story of a fictitious West African country caught in the grip of civil war. The dispassionate and deadpan narrator, Asante Kroma, is a former head of Secret Services and finds himself living with the corpse of the dictator, a man who once ruled his nation with an iron fist. Through a series of flashbacks and letters penned by the dictator, N’Zo Nikiema, readers discover the role of the French shadow leader, Pierre Castaneda, whose ongoing ambition to exploit the natural resources of the country knows no limits. As these powerful men use others as pawns in a violent real-life chess match, it is the murder of six-year-old Kaveena and her mother’s quest for vengeance that brings about a surprise reckoning.