Gina Barreca elected to Mark Twain House and Museum Board of Trustees

Professor Gina Barreca elected to Mark Twain House and Museum Board of Trustees.

Dr. Barreca earned her BA from Dartmouth College, where she was the first woman to be named an Alumni Scholar. She went on to receive her MA from Cambridge University as a Reynold’s Fellow and her PhD from the City University of New York. She is a professor of English and Feminist Theory at UConn, where she has been recognized for her excellence in teaching.

Barreca has also appeared on such television programs as The Today ShowCNN, and Oprah to discuss her views on gender, power, politics, and humor. Barreca is a syndicated columnist; her weekly columns for The Hartford Courant have been published in major newspapers across the country and globe, including The New York TimesCosmopolitan, and The Independent of London. Comedian Rachel Dratch says Barreca’s latest book, “If You Lean In, Will Men Just Look Down Your Blouse?”: Questions and Thoughts for Loud, Smart Women in Turbulent Times, “contains everything a good friend would provide: honesty, insight, female camaraderie, and a lot of laughs.”

“We are thrilled to have Gina Barreca serve on our Board of Trustees,” said Joel Freedman, President of The Mark Twain House & Museum’s board. “She brings a welcome energy, enthusiasm, knowledge, and good humor to the museum. My fellow board members and I look forward to working with her and know The Mark Twain House & Museum will benefit greatly from her input and presence.”

EGSA outside speaker Kevin Ohi

Kevin Ohi will present “‘The Make-Believe of a Beginning’: The Novel and Questions of Inception” on April 3 at 4pm in the Stern Lounge. Ohi is a professor of English at Boston College.

 

“Looking at a series of openings of novels by Sterne, Austen, Dickens, George Eliot, Flaubert, and Proust, the paper will ask whether the “beginning of the novel” might mark a crisis as definitional for the genre as that which, in poetics, Giorgio Agamben calls “the end of the poem.” Turning, perhaps, to the curiously self-grounding gestures of Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe and to Henry James’s theorization of the novel through the complex, contradictory, often baffled search for particular novels’ “germs,” it will attempt to explore some of the consequences of what Eliot calls  “the make-believe of a beginning,” in which the novel as a genre confronts a fundamental structure of writing.”

 

Contact george.p.moore@uconn.edu for questions about the presentations.

Congratulations to Sara Austin and Amanda Greenwell

Sara Austin has been awarded the Children’s Literature Association’s Hannah Beiter Graduate Student Research Grant for archival research at University of California, Riverside. She will explore the Eaton Collection for her dissertation project, “The Evolution of Monsters in Contemporary American Children’s and Young Adult Culture.”

Amanda Greenwell is the winner of Children’s Literature Association’s Graduate Student Essay Award for Jessie Willcox Smith’s Critique of Teleological Girlhood in ‘The Seven Ages of Childhood.”

Sean Forbes wins first place in poetry contest

Poem “Double Dutch Champion” won first-place prize of $100 in the 2017 Al Savard Poetry Contest of the Connecticut Poetry Society. About the poem, the judge wrote: Deceptively simple, this gem of a poem juggles the athleticism of rope-jumping with the exigencies of an orphan’s life. It’s as if the whirring cadences of the poem and of double Dutch itself are meant to hide and assuage Dickensian sorrows, but can’t. The sorrows, the hard facts of loss, never go away. As a winning poem, it will be posted on the Connecticut Poetry Society (CPS) website.

Miss Collegiality: A Round table on Colleagues, Community, and the Work of our Work

April 3rd from 12-1 in room 240 (American Studies Library) Miss Collegiality: A Round table on Colleagues, Community, and the Work of our Work. The goal of the round table is to demystify some of the unspoken obligations graduate students have when participating in an English department, as well as talking through some of the expectations and experiences in preparation to become junior faculty.

Laura Wright, Micah Goodrich, Dr. Steve Mollmann, and Dr. Patrick Lawrence will be speaking for a bit, and then we hope to have a lot of time for audience questions and discussions. While our speakers will have some topics prepared, others may write down some questions, concerns, and topics you’d like to hear about on the shared GoogleDoc.

Careers for English Majors: Strategies, Options, and Ideas

March 27 4-6 p.m. in Austin 217 (Stern Room) the Writing Internship Program’s annual panel presentation and discussion for English majors: “Careers for English Majors: Strategies, Options, and Ideas.”  Students have found this event highly informative, practical, and inspiring.

Despite job market concerns and the pessimism English majors confront about their choice of major, job options open to the specific skills of English majors are now quite varied, and English majors are increasingly in demand.  The panelists below are testimony to the creative ways in which English majors are shaping careers for themselves.

Four UConn English majors (see below) will present information about their own careers and job search strategies.  Given their experiences and professions, they have valuable advice and will answer questions about job market realities as well as the logistics and anxieties of job searches and interviews. The panelists will discuss the value of the English major and other concerns about professional life after graduation.

  • As everyone knows, the current job market poses numerous challenges for job applicants.
  • These panelists will speak to those challenges and offer both practical advice and encouragement.

The panelists below bring a broad range of internship and post-undergraduate experience:

Carla Calandra (’16), Publisher Support and Editorial Assistant, Oxford University Press, New York City

Mary Malley (’16), Assistant Editor, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, New York City

Myles Udland (’12), Business News Reporter, Yahoo Finance, New York City

Eric Vo (’13), Health News Reporter and Editor, Aetna, Hartford, CT

Refreshments will be served.

If you have questions, please e-mail ruth.fairbanks@uconn.edu.

 

Irish Studies Reading by Brenda Murphy

11:00am March 23 (Tues.), BUSN 204

Brenda Murphy is Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor of English Emeritus at UConn.  She is the author of twenty books, the most recent being Eugene O’Neill Remembered (2017), a biography in documents. The subject of her talk will be After the Voyage: An Irish American Story (2016), historical fiction based on the experience of her immigrant family in the Boston area from 1870 until the 1930s.

English Majors Admitted into the Neag’s Teacher Education Programs

The following sophomore English majors have been admitted to the Neag School of Education’s Integrated Bachelor’s/Master’s Program for Secondary English Education.  Most will earn a BA in English, a BS in Education, and an MA in Education.

Nicole Gerardin

Kathrine Grant

Amy Hamby

Tommy Jacobsen

Casey Long

Shane Leury

Marisa Macek

Megan O’Connor

Shelby Phipps

Sadie Robinson

Justin Rogers

Rachel Ruiz

Anna Stachura

Gabrielle Strain

Clarissa Tan

Samantha White

 

The following sophomore English students have been admitted to the Neag School of Education’s Integrated Bachelor’s/Master’s Program for Elementary Education.  Some will earn a BA in English along with BS and MA degrees in Education.  All will complete at least 24 credits in English as part of their content area concentration.

Gabrielle Bachoo

Aaron Blais

Kaitlyn Ferrara

Julia Gannon

Isabella Horan

Lauren Kumnick

Michela Mazzarrella

Alyssa O’Toole

Chantel Piniero

Courtney Rice

Konjit Richards-Johnson

Madeleine Rusk

Haley Shettles

Kathleen Shultz

Connor Strickland

 

The following sophomore English students have been admitted to the Neag School of Education’s Integrated Bachelor’s/Master’s Program for Special Education.  Some will earn a BA in English along with BS and MA degrees in Education.  All will complete at least 24 credits in English as part of their content area concentration.

Alexis Bardos

Julia Devivo

Nadejah Green

Michael Griffin

Cassidy Jenkins

Lauren Knerr

Victoria Smith

Jami Zolotor

 

The following senior English majors (and a couple of former graduates) have been admitted to the Neag School of Education’s Teacher Certification Program for College Graduates for Secondary English Education.  All will earn an MA in Education.

Emma Bristow (graduated 2013)

Ryan Cerniglia

Sara Chilone

Kristine Fillian

Benjamin Friedman (BFA in Film Studies)

Lindsay Glick

Nathan Hatfield

Jacob Jones

Katherine Kelly

Kamola Rabbimova

Clifford Saccoccio

Thomas Shea (graduated 2016)

Kara Tierney

Stephanie Zamary

 

The following senior English majors have been admitted to the Neag School of Education’s Teacher Certification Program for College Graduates for Special Education.  All will earn an MA in Education.

Andrew Ernsky

Monique Giresi

Marisa Prattson

Julia Vitti

 

Graduate students land new jobs

Congratulations to Steve Mollmann (PhD ‘16) on landing a job as Term Assistant Professor of English and Writing at the University of Tampa, where he will start in the fall.

Melissa Bugdal (PhD tentative ’17) begins this fall as Assistant Professor of English and Director of the University Writing Center at Salisbury University, Maryland.

Christiana Salah (PhD ’16) will begin this fall as Assistant Professor of English, specializing in 19th- and 20th-century British literature, at Hope College in Holland, Michigan.