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Kate Costello-Sullivan Talk: Carmilla

Kate Costello-Sullivan talk on Carmilla critical edition

Sept. 27, AUST 216 at 1:00pm

Costello-Sullivan is Professor of Modern Irish Literature and Dean of CAS at Le Moyne College, NY, where she founded the Irish literature program.  She has published widely on contemporary Irish fiction, including the first monograph on Colm Tóibín.  Trauma and Recovery in the 21st-Century Irish Novel was published this spring by Syracuse UP, where she has just been appointed General Editor. She is current VP of the American Conference for Irish Studies. She has edited a critical edition of J.S. Le Fanu’s Carmilla, the challenges of which will be the subject of her talk. mary.burke@uconn.edu to RESERVE A SEAT

Creative Writing Contests

The Creative Writing Contests are now open to submissions, and as always, offer significant monetary prizes as well as publishing and reading opportunities!

 

The Creative Writing Program offers many annual prizes with significant cash awards to undergraduate and graduate students. Each contest has its own set of guidelines so please read each carefully. You can read more about general guidelines in the Submission Guidelines Page (https://creativewriting.uconn.edu/writing-contests/writing-contest-guidelines/). Please note that all fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction contest submissions should be e-mailed to creativewritingcontests@uconn.edu.

AWP Intro Journals Project

November 1, 2018

The Intro Journals Project is a national literary competition for the discovery and publication of the best new works by students currently enrolled in the programs of the Associated Writing Programs (AWP). Winners receive a $50 cash honorarium and are published in Hayden’s Ferry ReviewMid-American ReviewPuerto del SolControlled BurnQuarterly WestTampa ReviewWillow Springs, or Artful Dodge. As a member program, the University of Connecticut is eligible to nominate one work of nonfiction, one work of short fiction, and three poems.

Who’s Eligible

Both graduate and undergraduate students at the University of Connecticut’s main and regional campuses.

Guidelines

Work submitted should be unpublished. Students may submit up to one essay, one work of fiction, and three poems. Prose should be double-spaced, poetry single-spaced. The subject line of the e-mail should indicate the full name of the contest and the genre of your submission (for example: “AWP Intro Journals Project – poetry”). Please submit your work via e-mail following these guidelines. The submission should consist of a single MS Word document that contains your cover sheet (see format) followed by your submission. (Note that while your student ID number should appear on every page of the packet, your name should appear only on the cover sheet.) Students may submit work in more than one genre but please do so in separate e-mails (in other words, do not include a short story and a poem in the same e-mail).

Wallace Stevens Poetry Prize

Deadline: December 10, 2018

Prizes: $1,000 (first); $500 (second); $250 (third)

Each year since 1964, a prominent poet has been invited to give a reading at the University of Connecticut as part of the Wallace Stevens Poetry Program. A student poetry contest is held in conjunction with that program. First, second, and third place cash prizes are awarded. Prize winners read from their work at the annual program, and winning poems will be published in the Long River Review.

Who’s Eligible

Undergraduate and graduate students from the University of Connecticut’s main and regional campuses, except previous first place winners.

Guidelines

Submit a single MS Word document containing the cover sheet followed by 5-8 pages of poems (cleanly typed, only one poem per page). This can be up to eight short poems, or several longer pieces. Please submit your work via e-mail following these guidelines. The subject line of the email must indicate the full name of the contest. Note that while your student ID number should appear on every page, your name should appear only on the cover sheet.

Aetna Translation Award

Deadline: December 10, 2018

Prize: $250

Students may submit one poem or an excerpt from a longer prose piece (maximum 1,500 words) translated into English, along with the original language version. The submission should consist of one Word document attachment: your cover sheet and your translated piece including the original language version.

Collins Literary Prizes

Deadline: December 10, 2018

Prizes: Varies Annually. The 2017–2018 awards were $2,000 each.

Awarded in memory of Edward R. and Frances S. Collins for the best undergraduate literary works. Two cash prizes are awarded, one in prose and one in poetry. Prize-winning works will be published in the Long River Review.

Who’s Eligible 

Undergraduate students at the University of Connecticut’s main and regional campuses.

Guidelines 

Please submit your work via e-mail following these guidelines. The subject line must include the full name of the contest and the genre of your submission (for example: “Collins Literary Prizes: poetry or prose”). The submission should consist of a single MS Word document that contains your cover sheet (see format) followed by your submission. (Note that while your student ID number should appear on every page of the packet, your name should appear only on the cover sheet.) Students may submit work in more than one genre but please do so in separate e-mails (in other words, do not include a short story and a poem in the same e-mail).

For this prize, please submit each piece individually.

Jennie Hackman Memorial Award for Short Fiction

Deadline: December 10, 2018

Prizes: $1,000 (first); $300 (second); $200 (third)

Awarded in memory of Jacob and Jennie Hackman for the best works of undergraduate short fiction. Up to three cash prizes awarded. Winning stories will be published in the Long River Review.

Who’s Eligible 

Undergraduate students at the University of Connecticut’s main and regional campuses.

Guidelines 

Please submit your work via e-mail following these guidelines. The subject line must include the name of the contest. The submission should consist of a single MS Word document that contains your cover sheet (see format) followed by your submission. Note that while your student ID number should appear on every page of the packet, your name should appear only on the cover sheet.

Aetna Creative Nonfiction Awards

Deadline: December 10, 2018

Prizes: Graduate $200-500; Undergraduate: $200-500

One prize each for the best graduate and undergraduate works of creative nonfiction will be awarded. Winners will receive a cash prize and will read from their work at an evening program featuring a notable guest author. Undergraduate first place winner’s work will also be published in the Long River Review.

Who’s Eligible

Graduate and undergraduate students at the University of Connecticut’s main and regional campuses.

Guidelines

Students may submit one unpublished creative nonfiction work. Please submit your work via e-mail following these guidelines. The subject line must include the name of the contest and your student status (for example: “AETNA Creative Nonfiction Awards – undergraduate”). The submission should be a single MS Word document that contains your cover sheet (see format) followed by your submission. Note that while your student ID number should appear on every page of the packet, your name should appear only on the cover sheet.

Long River Graduate Writing Award

Deadline: December 10, 2018

Prizes: $250

One cash prize awarded for the best piece of creative work in any genre written by a graduate student. The winning piece will be published in the Long River Review.

Who’s Eligible

Graduate students from any University of Connecticut department or campus.

Guidelines

Graduate students may submit prose pieces of up to 2,500 words, or for poetry, 1-3 poems. Please submit your work via e-mail following these guidelines. The subject line must include the full name of the contest and the genre of your submission (for example: “Long River Graduate Writing Award – poetry”). The submission should consist of a single MS Word document that contains your cover sheet (see format) followed by the submission. Note that while your student ID number should appear on every page of the packet, your name should appear only on the cover sheet.

Aetna Children’s Literature Award

Deadline: December 10, 2018

Prize: Graduate or Undergraduate, $250
The winning piece will be published in Long River Review.

Who’s Eligible:

Graduate and Undergraduate students from any University of Connecticut department or campus.

Guidelines

Please indicate whether you are submitting a manuscript for a picture book, a sample of children’s poetry or drama, or an excerpt from a middle-grade chapter book or a young adult novel. Limit of 3,000 words. Submit your work via e-mail following these guidelines. The subject line must include the full name of the contest and the genre of your submission (for example: “Collins Literary Prizes: poetry or prose”). The submission should consist of a single MS Word document that contains your cover sheet (see format) followed by the piece that you are submitting. Note that while your student ID number should appear on every page of the packet, your name should appear only on the cover sheet.

Gloriana Gill Awards For Drawing and Cartooning, and for Photography

Deadline: February 4, 2019

Prizes: Varies annually. Last year each prize was $1,000

Two awards given in memory of artist Gloriana Gill for 1) the best work of drawing or cartooning, and 2) the best work of photography (with preference given to B&W) appearing in the Long River Review. Entrants may submit multiple pieces to each prize.

Who’s Eligible

Undergraduates and graduates at the University of Connecticut’s main and regional campuses.

Guidelines

See this page.

Long River Review Art Award

Deadline: February 4, 2019

Prizes: $100 – $200

A cash prize for the best piece of artwork to appear in the Long River Review. Entrants may submit multiple pieces.

Who’s Eligible

Undergraduates and graduates at the University of Connecticut’s main and regional campuses.

Guidelines

See this page.

Calling Student Poets!

Poet Shane McCrae to be Fall Aetna Writer-in-Residence:
Graduate and Undergraduate Students are Invited to Participate.

Shane McCrae will spend three days at UConn this fall (October 24, 25, 26) as the Aetna Writer-in-Residence. Ten student writers will be selected to participate in one-on-one writing tutorials with Mr. McCrae. Students interested in participating should submit a typed 5-page manuscript of poetry to Professor Sean Forbes, English Department, Austin 208. Each manuscript must be accompanied by a cover sheet with the student’s name and all contact information. Manuscripts must be
received by Friday, October 5, 2018 for consideration.

Shane McCrae is the author of six books of poetry–most recently, In the Language of My Captor (2017), which won the 2018 Anisfield-Wolf Book Award for Poetry, and was a finalist for the National Book Award, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and the William Carlos Williams Award, and The Gilded Auction Block (2018). He is the recipient of a Lannan Literary Award, a Whiting Writer’s Award, and a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship. He teaches at Columbia University and lives in New York City.

The Aetna Writer-in-Residence Program began in 2003. Supported by funding from the Aetna Chair in Writing, UConn’s Creative Writing Program invites a nationally or internationally-known author to campus for a residency each semester. Each author spends three days on campus offering tutorials
for students, holding Q&A sessions with the campus community, leading master classes in creative writing, sharing meals with students, and giving a public reading of his or her work. As a result of the Aetna Writer-in-Residence program, UConn graduate and undergraduate students can
participate in an intense hands-on learning experience with some of
today’s most exciting authors.

Past Aetna Writers-in-Residence included Jeff Parker, Tara Betts, Kimiko Hahn, Amber Dermont, Jericho Brown, Laura van den Berg, Camille Dungy, Jo-Ann Mapson, Eduardo C. Corral, Andre Dubus III, G.C. Waldrep, Margot Livesey, Shara McCallum, Connie Voisine, Edmund White,Colum McCann, Lynne McMahon, Fay Weldon, Phillis Levin, Allen Kurzweil, Naeem Murr, Steve Almond, C.D. Wright, Stuart O’Nan, and Beth Ann Fennelly.

Harry Potter Trivia Competition

Please join the English Graduate Student Association for our fall fundraiser: a Harry Potter Trivia Competition! The event will take place on Wednesday, September 26 from 7-9pm at Grille 86 in Storrs Center. All ages are eligible to participate, and families, friends, and community members are welcome.

For more information and ticket sales, please visit our event website. We hope to see you there!

The Forms of Authoritarianism

THE FORMS OF AUTHORITARIANISM
A One-Day Conference: Thursday, September 20 @ Hartford Club (next to UConn Hartford campus).

UCONN HARTFORD, The Hartford Club, 46 Prospect St.
9:00am – 5:00pm

This one-day conference brings together scholars and journalists at the University of Connecticut and across the United States to discuss the various forms that authoritarianism is taking in the world today, from the Philippines to India, to Honduras and Venezuela, to Europe and the United States. It also aims to place this authoritarianism in historical perspective, comparing it to the anti-democratic currents of yesterday, whether in fascist Europe or in the Cold War dictatorships of Latin America.

The keynote speaker will be Ben Kiernan (Yale University). Program for the event.

This conference is hosted by American Studies with generous support from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the Humanities Institute, the Institute of Asian and Asian American Studies, and the Center for Judaic Studies and Contemporary Jewish Life.

Questions: contact Chris Vials (christopher.vials@uconn.edu)

Brian Sneeden Fiction Reading

Thursday, September 20

Brian Sneeden/ Fiction Reading

UConn Bookstore, Storrs Center, 6:00 pm

 

Sponsored by the Creative Writing Program and the UConn Bookstore.

 

Brian Sneeden is the author of the poetry collection Last City (2018). A 2018 PEN/Heim recipient, his poems and translations have appeared in Asymptote, Beloit Poetry Journal, Harvard Review, TriQuarterly, Prairie Schooner, Virginia Quarterly Review, and other publications, and translations of his poems have been published in international magazines in Greek, Italian, Albanian, and Serbian. His translation of Phoebe Giannisi’s poetry collection, Homerica (2017) was selected by Anne Carson as a favorite book of 2017 in The Paris Review. Brian received his MFA from the University of Virginia, where he held a Poe/Faulkner Fellowship in creative writing and served as poetry editor for Meridian. He is the senior editor of New Poetry in Translation.

Brown Bag Talks Announced!

The Chair of the Speakers and Symposia Committee for this academic year has officially announced the dates and times for the following Brown Bag talks for the fall semester:

Wednesday, September 5th at 2:30-4:00pm  Cathy Schlund-Vials, “West of the Militarized Zone: Fightin’ Army, Blurred Genres, and the Vietnam War.”

Wednesday, October 10th at 2:30-4:00pm    Debapriya Sarkar (title TBA)

Wednesday, November 14th at 2:30-4:00pm   Sarah Winter (title TBA)

All talks will be in the Stern Lounge after the Department faculty meetings. Details on each talk will be forthcoming.