Month: April 2020

AETNA Celebration of Student Writing

2020 AETNA Student Writing Poster Fair & Showcase

The Aetna Celebration of Student Writing (ACSW) is an annual UConn event held by the Aetna Chair of Writing to showcase student writing work and writing-related research. Students present their writing work completed in writing-intensive UConn courses (First-Year Writing, “W” courses) and/or research on the subject of writing, rhetoric, or a related topic. Individual and group projects are accepted.

The ACSW opens with a poster fair, where students present their work first to a circulating panel of faculty judges and then to the public. The judges create awards based on the selection of projects that are presented each year. The poster fair awards are then announced at the reception that follows.

Takes place: Apr. 27, 3-5:30pm

Storrs Campus, Wilbur Cross, North Reading Room

Submission Deadline: Apr. 1, 2020

For more details and to submit work, visit bit.ly/submit2acsw

Conference on Teaching Writing

University of Connecticut, First-Year Writing
Fifteenth Annual Conference on the Teaching of Writing
April 17, 2020, UConn Hartford Campus

Making Your Writing Course Move
The University of Connecticut First-Year Writing Program’s Conference on the Teaching of Writing will take place Friday, April 17, on the UConn Hartford Campus. Our theme this year is Making Your Writing Course Move, with keynote speaker Jenae Cohn of Stanford University.

UConn First-Year Writing is at the end of a multi-year curriculum redesign based on recent research on multimodal composing, accessibility, and digital literacies. As our program and Rhet/Comp in general have experienced a digital
turn, we must also consider the ways digital writing still engages bodies and the role bodies, norms about embodiment, and bodily literacies have in composition in all modes.
Scholars such as Christina V. Cedillo and Robert McRuer have argued that composition courses tend to privilege certain kinds of movement in writing, a movement that also assumes whiteness, ablebodiness, and straightness or wholeness.

This conference asks in what ways instructors of writing can make space for diverse kinds of movement, or facilitate movement that may not always lead to wholeness or completion. Recent work in the field has also considered
how technologies may destabilize traditional or normative modes of composition. Jenae Cohn’s latest work, for example, explores the ways in which digital reading practices and the moves therein create opportunities for more inclusive perspectives of what reading for learning can look like. Her keynote talk will draw upon her forthcoming book, Skim, Dive, Surface: Strategies for Digital Reading in the College Classroom.

We have designed our First-Year Writing classes around five “ course moves ” that prioritize active learning and accessibility. Each move offers a way to think about what we do when we write.

Apply at our conference website https://fyw.uconn.edu/ctw2020/